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Why does society love porn actresses, but looks down it’s nose on escorts, massage girls and sex workers?

The internet started a sex work revolution. Porn's been a part of the web since the earliest days - there were explicit pictures online back in the eighties, before the internet even really existed!  It paved the way for the sex industry to become what it is today.

Of course, more sex work means more sex workers, and more hand wringing about whether it's morally acceptable to profit off of your own body. More recently, sites like OnlyFans have made it possible for anyone to try their hand at sex work, adding even more fuel to the dumpster fire that is the 'discussion' around the sex industry.

Sex workers have unprecedented freedom and control over their particular brand of content.  That's an undeniable fact.  But is there more acceptance of the work they do and how they choose to go about it?  Not really.

Porn is the biggest and most profitable branch of the sex industry.  But the easy availability of porn doesn't mean that the people who make it are looked on in any better of a light.  After all, porn has been around forever. Even in the Middle Ages there were books and drawings meant to arouse the viewer, and that was hardly a time known for its enlightened views about sex.

Porn and other products of sex work might be more acceptable today, but the perception of the women (and men, but the majority of sex workers are women) who go into this line of work has improved little over the years. Sex workers in Aylesbury face contempt, vitriol, and ridicule from a huge swath of the population, many of whom consume the same content produced by the women they shame. And while the internet has allowed the sex industry to balloon in size, it's also made this kind of hatred more open and public than ever before.

Despite the face that pornography is one of the only legal outlets for women to profit off of their bodies, porn actresses are still looked down upon. A single look at how the women in the porn industry are treated tells you all you need to know about how society views girls who work in Aylesbury massage parlours.

There's a million exposes, interviews, and tell-alls detailing the coercion and abuse that would-be porn stars face when filming their scenes. One-sided legal contracts trap them into filming painful and humiliating scenes for hardly more than a pittance.

Back in 2019, Mia Khalifa, at one time the most popular porn star in the world, spoke out about the predatory practices of the porn industry, and how little the actresses are valued. Her denouncement of the industry prompted a rare period of reflection on the treatment of actresses in the business. But even after the acknowledgement of the abuse, there remains an overwhelming perception that women in porn must deserve or enjoy the abuses they endure - they did choose it as a career, after all. It's a line of thought that's been used as justification for the mistreatment of sex workers for hundreds of years.

Of course, the harsh conditions porn actresses face in the business might be preferable to the alternative.  At least they make some money while filming, however little that might be. Outside of porn, any woman with a history of adult acting faces a near-impossible task in trying to find and keep any other job.  There's no such thing as legal protection in the workplace for adult actresses.  All it takes is one coworker to google their name to get them fired, and that's if they manage to get work in the first place.

Though porn itself is entirely legal, the women who make it face vicious backlash for having the audacity to make money using their bodies.  They're branded as whores and deemed unfit to work alongside the rest of society. The internet has become a public forum to lash out against these women, and helps fuel the misogyny that underlies the prejudice against sex workers.

Nowhere has this prejudice become more apparent than on the website OnlyFans. Though it isn't limited to explicit content, the platform has become known for hosting suggestive and outright pornographic profiles, particularly during the last year when many people were trapped in quarantine.

Onlyfans offers a way for creators to sell themselves without involvement in the porn industry, but they still can't escape the sexism and stigma so pervasive on the internet. "Slut", "bitch", "whore", and other insults are tossed around casually on both the site itself and Twitter threads about OnlyFans creators. The vitriol highlights the casual rejection of sex workers - if a woman is too open or free with her sexuality, she's dismissed as worthless by one of the many, many pejoratives for a promiscuous woman.

The website makes it plain that even other sex workers are not immune to the stigmatization that their profession faces. There are different degrees of creators on OnlyFans: some choose to post themselves fully nude, while others prefer to keep the clothes on and stick with skimpy clothing and risque poses. There's a tendency for creators who don't post nudes to look down on those who do - it isn't universal, but it's a common pattern. Even those on the inside of the sex industry often parrot the same lines spouted society about their profession.

In the past two decades or so, the internet has changed almost every facet of everyday life. You can talk to someone a million miles away, find people that share interests with you, no matter how obscure - and access more porn than anyone could consume in a thousand lifetimes.

People watch more porn than ever, whether on OnlyFans or more traditional porn sites.  Thousands of young women enter the sex industry and choose to sell their bodies every year.  But the popularity of sex content shouldn't be mistaken for acceptance of sex work itself. Sex industry professionals still face dirty, dangerous conditions every day, and often earn little more than ridicule and disdain as a result.  Changing attitudes around sex work will need a lot more work than what has been done so far.