Salem

 

How Has Society Learned to Love Salem escorts – But Not the Sex Industry?

To answer the question of whether society's attitudes have changed towards those people who enter the sex industry, it is useful to begin with the language that is used towards those who sell sex for a living. Language is, and always has been a good pointer towards how attitudes may evolve and shift over time.  Has society's attitude changed towards sex workers generally, or is there still a sizeable proportion of the population who regards sex 'work' as being somehow 'unethical' and those who perform sex work as as 'immoral' in some way?

The question cannot be answered merely from an ethical perspective.  Humans are moral creatures, yet society does not function on moral values alone. It is more helpful to look at society as not just one homogeneous unit with a consistent set of moral standards and ideas, which it isn't.  Rather we live in a secular world of ethical, cultural and political complexity; as well as a society of different religious beliefs, or none.  This plurality of lifestyles, and cultural settings inform the overall social landscape in which we live, and it is the same society that sex workers find themselves having to negotiate.

The secularisation of modern society may in some ways be helpful to sex workers, not necessarily because society has 'accepted' prostitution, but simply because the prostitution as a 'lifestyle' has become one of many possibilities, thus allowing it to somehow 'blend' in or become one of a set of cultures (or sub-cultures).

To return to the subject of how attitudes may inform our language (or vice versa) the term 'prostitute' has now been replaced by the more innocuous sounding 'sex worker,' at least within everyday language.   However, the term 'prostitute' and 'prostitution' is still used within more formal settings, such as some websites on the internet; see the example link below, which outlines the number of soliciting offences in England and Wales from the years 20002-2020.

According to the data provided, the number of offences recorded for soliciting and prostitution in England and Wales has declined steeply from 2,111 offences in 2002/2003 to just 375 offences for soliciting in 2019/2020.

These statistics may lead one to think that society has generally become more tolerant towards sex workers and therefore, there are fewer prosecutions for offences of soliciting.  However, the reasons for the decline in numbers may be more complex than the figures at first suggest.

For example, many sex workers now advertise online rather than through newspaper columns, or through soliciting on the streets, allowing them a better degree of anonymity.

There has also been a shift towards treating prostitutes as 'victims' rather than criminals, favouring the Swedish/Nordic model, where it is the client who is prosecuted rather than the sex worker herself/himself, thus targeting those who create the 'demand' for sex, rather than those who supply it.  Yet, despite this shift in attitudes, many sex workers still risk arrest and prosecution as a result of soliciting (which still remains an offence in England and Wales).

What’s the difference between prostitutes in Oregon and an girl working for an escort agency in Salem?

However, there seem to be very good reasons for this more benevolent approach to regarding prostitutes in Salem as 'victims,' rather than as 'offenders.' This shift in attitudes has mirrored a more liberal approach towards the role of women in society more generally, and might therefore encourage a more sympathetic awareness of the violence and exploitation that many sex workers often face.  Also the problems of poverty, drug addiction and sex trafficking have also come more to public awareness in recent times via online websites such as The Coalition Against Trafficking in Women.

Many sex workers are not in the sex industry out of choice!  Many are forced into sex work for a number of reasons. Yet there are still others who have made a positive choice, and who argue that their profession allows them to earn very good money compared to some of the more standard jobs often advertised, as well as allowing them more autonomy in their work and lifestyle choices. Yet whatever the reasons people may have for being in the sex industry, the attitude of society remains at best, ambivalent towards sex workers in Salem OR, or at worse positively hostile, depending on what country or society one is referring to.

The sex industry remains a sub-culture, particularly in more conservative societies (and the laws governing prostitution in Oregon are both complex and confusing). It is likely that the Courts, as well as many members of the public, still regard sex work as being inherently harmful, or not what could be regarded as proper 'work.'  Yet prostitution may not be inherently harmful, but the attitudes towards sex workers and how they are treated are indeed harmful, and this leads to further problems for sex workers, driving the sex industry underground and so exposing call girls in Salem to further abuse and exploitation. Furthermore, there is no obvious evidence that criminalising third parties, such as brothel keepers does anything to lessen or eliminate 'demand from clients.

So has society changed its attitudes towards sex industry workers?

To some extent maybe we have! But not because society necessarily regards prostitution as acceptable! Rather, authorities have approached prostitution more in a spirit of damage limitation. In other words, society has sought to lessen the harm done and the dangers that Salem escorts find themselves up against, with increased awareness of the dangers and more emphasis on human rights.  It is unlikely we will ever fully accept paid sexual services as acceptable.  But we have learned to be more sympathetic to those who live that lifestyle. Sex remains too intimate an act in the lives of most people, who must invariably and instinctively feel that for the most part, what is for the majority of people a demonstration of love for another person, can somehow can be cheapened by turning it into a mere financial transaction.